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Friday, April 12, 2013

Keeping procedures up to date with law

On Guam, we find many regulations and government contract provisions that are inconsistent with law, most often because the many changes to law that legislatures cannot seem to resist making are not recognized in contracts used by the procuring agencies. The following article is an illustration that this defect in the system is not restricted to Guam.

There are other interesting controversies revealed in the story that are not directly on this point. Read more at the article link.

Report: Afghan militants could get contract funds
The special inspector general for Afghan reconstruction, John F. Sopko, said weaknesses mar procedures that the Defense Department tightened in 2012 to comply with a new federal law aimed at preventing militants from obtaining U.S. contract payments.

Sopko said his new audit detected flaws in a provision that Congress added last year to a defense authorization bill. The provision gave the Defense Department the authority to "restrict, terminate or void" any contracts with individuals or organizations opposing U.S. or coalition forces in Afghanistan. Sopko said his audit found that language in some contracts did not contain the new provision, which is legally necessary to sever any contracts unwittingly given to militants.

Sopko also warned the Pentagon that it needed to develop a standard process for tracking suspect contractors and notifying contracting officials and contractors about suspect contractors and their obligations under the law.

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