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Wednesday, February 4, 2015

The problem with school books

Every year for every class since modern education began, students need books, and typically they are provided by the schools. But it seems to come as a surprise to many of the schools.  

Every year.

Guam schools have notoriously been poor managers of text book requirements for decades.  But it is not being singled out. Consider the following:

Sierra Leone: Procurement Irregularities Uncovered At Education Ministry
According to the 2013 Auditor General's report, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology failed to follow procurement rules in the year under review, thus violating the National Public Procurement Authority Act 2004.

The report states that the ministry adopted a restricted bidding method approved by the National Public Procurement Authority (NPPA) for no objection on the basis of urgency of time.

It also notes that it took more than six months from the inception of the process to the award and signing of the contract agreement for the supply of foods, while it took more than eight months from the commencement of the process to the signing of the contract agreements for the supply of text books and teaching and learning materials.

Thus, the report concludes that it stands to reason that ministry officials had sufficient time to have followed the required procurement processes.
Sound familiar?

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